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Sunday, November 18, 2018
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18 Nov 7:00am Rear view: the big business of bottoms
The Guardian
As more and more women go under the knife in pursuit of curves, it’s clear they are paying with their health The press briefing for October’s Clinical Cosmetic Reconstructive Expo in London was delayed – there had been another death. A cluster of journalists gathered on the mezzanine while below them visitors filtered past signs for She Lase and Zero Gravity Skin and a stand for a company called Eurosilicone that claims to have been “Empowering women for over 30 years”. At the far end of the conference hall, a woman was having her jawline enhanced with fillers in front of a rapt crowd; the Safety in Beauty stand was empty. Back on the mezzanine, there was a rustle of suits as the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS) entered the room. Apologies for the delay, one said solemnly, there has been another death. A second British woman has died this year after a Brazilian Butt Lift (BBL). Which made their announcement that they were henceforth warning surgeons not to perform the procedure particularly urgent. The brief was called “The Bottom Line”. The big butt trend is sold as a step towards greater body acceptance
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18 Nov 6:00am Unexpected plant joy from rocky places | James Wong
The Guardian
Bricks, floral foam and volcanic rock all made excellent growing media for plants that thrive without soil Recently, while flicking through an almost 20-year-old copy of the Royal Horticultural Society’s
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18 Nov 4:00am Can the right childminder turn my baby into an infant prodigy?
The Guardian
Parental paranoia and genius children muddy the search for childcare ‘Do they get much time outside?’ I asked our prospective childminders, gaining a flash of admiration from my wife. Like me, she couldn’t quite tell if we were interviewing or being interviewed. With more trivial concerns, I’m great at posing probing questions. I grilled our broadband guy like I was in Mossad, and if someone asks me the name of a face-melting techno track I haven’t heard in a decade, I develop the cunning of a bloodhound with a degree in Swiss tax law. But for grown-up problems, I freeze. I once viewed a flat in Canonbury and realised hours later that it didn’t have a sitting room. When I ask someone for directions, I spend so much energy nodding my head that I’m incapable of remembering anything they say. More than once, a stranger has caught up with me to ask why I’d immediately headed in the opposite direction. ‘Yes, we have a lovely garden area,’ our childcare professional assured me, happy to impress us, or eyeing up our child to see if he made the cut. The garden was good since, on my quest to place my son’s chubby feet on the childcare ladder’s first rungs, outdoor space was listed as a must. Talk of competition for places had wormed into my brain, and a simple search for childminders snowballed into a parental paranoia spiral that saw me on the kinds of sites that tell you the best way to get your child doing the
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18 Nov 4:00am Thanks for my coffee… On the great gratitude trail
The Guardian
Gratitude is good for us. With this in mind, writer A.J. Jacobs determines to cast off his habitual grumpiness and track down and say thank you to everyone responsible for his daily brew… It’s a Tuesday morning, and I’m in the presence of one of the most mind-boggling accomplishments in human history. This marvel I see before me is the result of thousands of human beings collaborating across dozens of countries. It took the combined labour of chemists, politicians, mechanics, biologists, miners, packagers, smugglers and goatherds. It required aeroplanes, boats, trucks and shoulders and hundreds of materials, including steel and bat guano. It has caused great joy, but also great poverty and oppression. It relied upon ancient wisdom and space-age technology, freezing temperatures and scorching heat, high mountains and deep water. It is my morning cup of coffee. For most of my life, I rarely thought about my coffee, unless it spilled on my jacket. But the last few months have forced me to change that. A recent study showed that gratitude causes people to be more generous and kinder to strangers. Another study summarised in
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18 Nov 3:59am Cold comfort: in praise of the flu jab | Eva Wiseman
The Guardian
It’s that time of year again – the trip to the chemist, the little room, the little jab. Eva Wiseman reveals why avoiding actual flu is not the only reason she loves having the shot The most magical time of the year – flu jab day, my chosen Christmas. I love it. I love the efficiency of popping into the chemist at lunchtime, as if for a meal deal or tampon, and leaving with the knowledge that I’m safe from four strains of flu, as well as a meal deal and a tampon. I love the wait on the hard chairs, the cheery conversation with a stranger whose neck has completely gone and who’s had it up to here with her boss. Last year I had a good chat with a man waiting for his methadone – he said it tasted horrid. I love to sit among those boxes of potential cures for whatever ails, whether head or feet or the hazy no-man’s land in between. I hear the lowered voices of people asking the chemist for bum cream, and prevent myself from shouting, in all my flu jab love: “We are all people my friend! Underneath our jacket, cardigan, T-shirt and pants, we are all people, and we all have a bum! Don’t be shy, you are home amongst your own kind.” At this time of year it is a constant struggle not to become one of the people that shouts affectionately at strangers. I love proselytising noisily as if a missionary returned from war
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18 Nov 3:00am Ramla Ali: ‘In boxing we are all equal’
The Guardian
After her family fled Somalia and settled in Britain, Ramla Ali secretly took up boxing, having been teased at school for being overweight. Now she’s a national champion, and inspiring other African and Muslim women to fight When Ramla Ali, a British champion boxer, is preparing for an important tournament, she visits the Peacock gym in Canning Town, east London, where
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18 Nov 2:00am Head for the Black Hills: tales of Crazy Horse and Custer in South Dakota
The Guardian
The carving of the Crazy Horse statue is a story in itself but then insurgent tales and mountain sculptures have helped shape this midwest state It takes a few seconds for the statue of Crazy Horse to come into focus, which is surprising given that it’s being carved out of a 641ft-high stone outcrop. From a distance it looks like just another rocky peak silhouetted against the cloudless South Dakota sky. But get closer and its form and detail become apparent: an unyielding face, a raised arm, a pointing finger, all recreated on a colossal scale. The Crazy Horse statue is either an epic feat or grand folly
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18 Nov 1:00am Love face masks? Wait until you try a hair mask
The Guardian
Sometimes our hairdos need a little help Lord knows I
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18 Nov 1:00am From the archive: happy 21st birthday Prince Charles
The Guardian
As Prince Charles turns 70, we revisit an article from the Observer that was first published almost 50 years ago In hindsight, the opening sentence of the
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18 Nov 1:00am Beauty tips: mesmerise with glittering sci-fi lips
The Guardian
Why wear lipstick when you can wear a solar system? At Martin Margiela, models didn’t wear lipstick, they wore entire solar systems, pressed on Vaseline. Some had twinkly silver lips that matched their holographic blazers, while others had blended shades of purple and gold. If you’re not ready to go fully pigmented, enjoy the private knowledge you’re adapting a Pat McGrath trend by simply slicking on a glinting gloss.
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18 Nov 1:00am Čezeta e-scooter: ‘The rebirth of the chicest communist-era scooter of all time’ | Martin Love
The Guardian
After an absence of half a century, the radical, torpedo-shaped Čezeta is set to turn heads everywhere
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18 Nov 1:00am Planning ahead for next year’s rush of rooftop colour | Allan Jenkins
The Guardian
Dreaming of the bulbs in pots, paperwhites and tulips to come We have finally purged the summer pots. The geranium and lobelia have been culled. The petunia has been composted and the tomato plants have returned to earth. Our rooftop is austere again. Well, apart from the Indian carvings, the sari print blocks, the sea of sea shells. The hot summer of 2018 has been packed away. GMT is quiet time at home. Next spring, around Easter, I will start hankering after new colour. Until then the magnolia stellata will bud, the assorted hellebore (speckled, green, white, crimson and almost purple-flowered: I went slightly mad after leaving it late this year) will have to carry the weight. Howard has brought us a Bengal Crimson rose back from the Great Dixter autumn plant fair. A China rose (Rosa x odorata), long-flowering, perfect single petals, slightly fragrant, it joins the apricot and yellow roses on the roof.
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18 Nov 1:00am Nigel Slater’s roast autumn vegetables recipe
The Guardian
Let the oven do the hard work with golden roasted dishes Food cooked on the hob demands constant attention – a stir, the rigorous monitoring of heat, the regular check of progress. And there is always the temptation to tinker. Food cooked in the oven tends to get on with business itself. Yes, we slide out the Sunday joint to baste it lovingly with the roasting juices and we gingerly test the spring of a cake with a finger, but intervention is less crucial when dinner is cooking behind a closed door. Apples, parsnips and pears are at their most delicious when they meet the heat of the oven When the fruit is golden and sticky and the cranberries start to burst, remove from the oven
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18 Nov 1:00am Twisted Land Rover preview: ‘The much-loved classic gets a major twist’ | Martin Love
The Guardian
Just when you thought the classic Defender was no more, along comes a firm determined to keep the 4x4 as relevant and desirable as ever
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18 Nov 12:59am Vermouth makes a comeback | David Williams
The Guardian
The rise in the popularity of cocktails – and particularly gin-based ones – means that the herby, fortified pleasures of vermouth are once again on our lips
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18 Nov 12:59am Wok Inn Noodle Bar, Blackpool: ’Utterly beguiling’ – restaurant review
The Guardian
Hot, colourful and dizzyingly eclectic, the Wok Inn really does illuminate Blackpool’s seafront
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18 Nov 12:59am My sister has always bullied me. And she still makes me anxious | Dear Mariella
The Guardian
You are making it easy for your older sister to dominate you, Mariella Frostrup tells a woman in her 20s that she no longer needs to play by the old rules
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