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The Guardian

Sunday, September 16, 2018
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Flower power: how to make the summer last forever 16 Sep 6:00am Flower power: how to make the summer last forever
The Guardian
When the frost sets in, put bedding plants in a pot and rehouse them indoors I know as a garden writer I am supposed to wax lyrical about the change of seasons, finding joy in the crisp air and falling leaves. But I have to confess, as someone who loves growing things, that to me the start of autumn only means one thing – the end of summer. The impending threat of frost does, however, have an upside – the chance of free houseplants. It’s a way to make summer flowers last forever indoors, and here’s how to do it. Many of the most popular bedding plants, whose subtropical origins mean they have little to no defence against frost, also happen to make excellent houseplants. In a season when they are normally ripped out and binned to make way for the new, rehoming them indoors not only gives you houseplants for free but helps lessen the impact of what can be an extremely wasteful gardening practice. Also, as varieties of bedding plants can come and go in a surprisingly short space of time, sometimes disappearing from catalogues with no notice from one year to the next, if you are particularly in love with a variety, this can be a sure-fire way of keeping it in your collection.
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How to win friends – and keep them 16 Sep 3:00am How to win friends – and keep them
The Guardian
Emma Beddington has never mastered the art of friendship – so when she moved back to her hometown, she turned to science instead. But would it open doors? Moving back to my childhood home town after 25 years has meant many things keep me awake at night. What have we done, will my sons start taking spice, why is York obsessed with bubble tea and Harry Potter, where did all these seagulls come from? One that recurs frequently, late at night, as the birds shriek outside my window is: will I make friends here? We have just arrived after 12 years in Brussels and the past few weeks have been a whirl of call-centre absurdity and cardboard boxes. Soon, though, things will calm down, my 14- and 16-year-old boys will vanish, as teenagers do, my husband will return to Brussels for work and I will be home alone. My tally of local mates stands at one: my late mother’s 71-year-old best friend, to whom I have attached myself, limpet-like, revelling in a shared love of cake and gloomy chat. I sign up to meet others, speak French and drink ‘du bon ale’
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‘We’re brothers, sisters and activists’: the Greek collective of gay and trans refugees 16 Sep 3:00am ‘We’re brothers, sisters and activists’: the Greek collective of gay and trans refugees
The Guardian
For persecuted gay and trans refugees, getting together has given them a safe space as well as vital support. Edward Siddons hears how the group became family they never had Maha was a final-year trainee at a police academy in Basra, southeast Iraq, when her phone went missing. It was summer 2011. Only 17, she was nervous about telling her parents, though not especially worried. Only when she was summoned to the dean’s office three days later did she realise she was in danger. A dozen or so sheets of white paper were neatly arranged on the dean’s desk. One by one, he turned them over to reveal print-outs of intimate photos taken from Maha’s phone. In some she was naked, nestled in the arms of a man whose face remains just out of shot. In others she wears makeup stolen from her mother’s dresser. Female sexuality remains tightly surveilled in much of Iraq, but Maha’s predicament was altogether more complicated: a transgender woman, Maha was still a man in the eyes of her family and the state. We are rejected by our families, by society and by the authorities Just because I’m a refugee doesn’t mean I’m not having sex, honey
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Bite the bullet train and head to Japan 16 Sep 2:00am Bite the bullet train and head to Japan
The Guardian
Instead of lazing by the Med, Jay Rayner decided to take his family to Japan. It wasn’t an entirely selfless act … food played a major part, naturally Getting to eat the good stuff in Tokyo can be a challenge. The problem isn’t finding the right places. The concierge team at the city’s hotels work harder than most making restaurant reservations, and ours at the Mandarin Oriental is no exception. They have sent us to a bustling, wood-lined
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16 Sep 2:00am Jenna Coleman: ‘Being me makes me feel self-conscious’
The Guardian
She reigned as Queen Victoria and is now back on screen as a traumatised mum from Glasgow. Jenna Coleman tells Elizabeth Day how these ‘brave’ women made her so much stronger The other day Jenna Coleman gave birth for the seventh time. “I feel like my year has been literally maternity bras and pregnancy bumps,” she says over a cup of tea in acafénear her home in north London. “It’s becoming a parody now.” Before you start to worry about the medical anomaly that is Coleman’s uterus, rest assured it was all for the cameras. In real life, the 32-year-old Coleman has yet to have children: “I don’t know if the time is now for me,” she says. Onscreen, however, she has been through a long phase of playing mothers. She is in the middle of filming the third series of
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Nigel Slater’s marrow recipes 16 Sep 1:00am Nigel Slater’s marrow recipes
The Guardian
The giant of the harvest festival is best fried or grilled and tossed in marinade I am not a churchgoer – my visits falling very much into hatch, match and dispatch – yet I find a peep through an open church door irresistible. The most memorable was one into the now deconsecrated St Mary’s in Knightwick, Worcestershire, where, aged 12, I spotted the windowsills and altar festooned with jam-jars of spiky dahlias and pots of greengage jam. There were plums and pumpkins in glowing ochre, too, and vast green and white marrows from villagers’ gardens and allotments. A scene of humble abundance. I am not averse to finding the occasional marrow in the vegetable rack. I suspect I buy them out of nostalgia rather than any thought of good eating. The vast green zeppelin then sits around until guilt finally gets the better of me and I take the knife to it. I have a soft spot for the blandness of a marrow hidden under a blanket of decent cheese sauce. A good enough supper if you can remember to add cloves, onion and bay to the sauce as well as a snowy mountain of grated pecorino. I sometimes peel them and cut the flesh into small cubes, cooking them in a shallow pan on the hob with chubby, fennel-seed sausages from the deli. As the sausages burnish in the heat, they offer up a sticky, deeply savoury goo in which to cook the marrow.
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Kalashnikov CV-1 electric car: ‘It looks like a 6th-form school project’ | Martin Love 16 Sep 1:00am Kalashnikov CV-1 electric car: ‘It looks like a 6th-form school project’ | Martin Love
The Guardian
The manufacturer famous for its machine gun has turned its attention to making electric cars. Will it go with a bang?
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How I fled a bad marriage in Iran for a new life in London 16 Sep 1:00am How I fled a bad marriage in Iran for a new life in London
The Guardian
Cooking Iranian dishes for her new neighbours opened all sorts of doors for Atoosa Sepehr In December 2007,
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From the archive: teenagers in close-up 16 Sep 1:00am From the archive: teenagers in close-up
The Guardian
The report in the cover story of 12 September 1976 failed to notice the impending punk generation How sweet is 16, wondered the ‘Teenagers in close-up’ cover story for the
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Open wide and give your eye lashes a boost | Eva Wiseman 16 Sep 1:00am Open wide and give your eye lashes a boost | Eva Wiseman
The Guardian
The 60s are back in fashion when it comes to eye makeup. Here’s how to get your mascara to give you the look you want It is the season of 60s-style lashes, heavily mascara-ed and tweaked into sharp little peaks, for understated glamour. At Givenchy, Pat McGrath made eyelashes the focus of the face, creating a look of wide-eyed wonder. It couldn’t be easier to experiment yourself. Try repositioning the wand to concentrate product on the ends, and make sure you’re not overloading the brush for maximum control. It’s time to go on the lash.
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16 Sep 1:00am Dahlias, class wars and early autumn colour | Allan Jenkins
The Guardian
Growing pots of dahlias on the roof terrace provides a late summer burst of brightness but also reminds Allan Jenkins of his dad Dad hated dahlias. They were ‘common’. And as for chrysanthemums... Dad was from Derbyshire. We were in Devon. He thought of them as a northern flower, mostly grown by men on allotments, for show, with competitive shades and shapes. I was always more comfortable with the thought of being common than Dad, who was proudly, profoundly middle class. We had a huge garden, there was an orchard, long lawns, there were red hot pokers, even pampas grass, but he drew the line at dahlias.
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16 Sep 12:59am Favorit BigBoss: ‘A legendary Czech brand comes back to life’ | Martin Love
The Guardian
Heard the one about the Czech firm that’s back from the brink? After Skoda’s rebirth comes a two-wheel success story
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