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Sunday, April 22, 2018
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Corita Kent, the pop art nun 22 Apr 5:30am Corita Kent, the pop art nun
The Guardian
She shook up the church and the art world with her expressive, exuberant and boisterous work Pop Art gave the world Andy Warhol,
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Hanya Yanagihara: influential magazine editor by day, best-selling author by night 22 Apr 3:00am Hanya Yanagihara: influential magazine editor by day, best-selling author by night
The Guardian
It’s enough to make your head spin, but the New York Times journalist and novelist wouldn’t have it any other way. Emma Brockes meets her in New York When Hanya Yanagihara was 10 years old, her father let her visit a pathologist’s lab. He was a doctor and an artist, twin interests his young daughter shared so that when the pathologist opened the cadaver, she whipped out a sketch pad and started to draw. “I was always interested in the disease, not the human,” she says of that early fascination with medicine, a forensic interest that foreshadowed the themes of her fiction and, 30 years later, found Yanagihara in an unusual life: writing acclaimed novels at night, with a day job as a senior editor at the
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Sexual addiction, desire and dopamine hits 22 Apr 3:00am Sexual addiction, desire and dopamine hits
The Guardian
Not all sex addicts are sexual predators – many are just struggling to contain their destructive urges. Andrew Anthony meets addicts and therapists to hear how they cope with this secretive pandemic Of the many alleged victims of the film producer
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From Venice into the mountains: fizzing around on the prosecco trail 22 Apr 2:00am From Venice into the mountains: fizzing around on the prosecco trail
The Guardian
Prosecco is more popular than ever and from the bacaros of La Serenissima into the Veneto its qualities are being celebrated – and visiting its producers makes for a great wine holiday, too Few cities are more intimately acquainted with a drink than Venice is with prosecco. Produced mainly in the Veneto region, of which Venice is the capital, it is sipped in every back-street
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Amy Schumer: ‘I’m not invincible. I need to slow down’ 22 Apr 2:00am Amy Schumer: ‘I’m not invincible. I need to slow down’
The Guardian
Outrageously rude and shockingly funny, Amy Schumer has always made her audiences gasp. She talks to Sophie Heawood about falling in love, one-night stands and going nuts on stage When I meet Amy Schumer, she has been married for exactly one month and is working on a joke about her husband’s penis. Something along the lines of, my husband is uncircumcised – for
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We all deserve the right to be forgotten | Eva Wiseman 22 Apr 1:00am We all deserve the right to be forgotten | Eva Wiseman
The Guardian
For a generation who has lived under the unforgiving scrutiny of social media, it should be possible for moments of regret not to follow you into adulthood We don’t yet know what the effect will be, do we, of living your life sprawled across the internet, of sharing every passing thought from your unwashed mind, of photos from your 16th birthday at Alton Towers fossilising on Facebook, and the look you were giving Adam, and the trainers you cleaned that morning. Across
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From the archive: on the hippy trail 22 Apr 1:00am From the archive: on the hippy trail
The Guardian
The year is 1971, and the Observer takes a dim view of the ‘listless and apathetic’ youths on India’s hippy trail A tanned youth clad in just a sarong takes a wistful drag from a joint while reclining on a bank of the Himalayan foothills. This is not your mum’s godson Rupert, who spent his gap yah in Nepal ‘finding himself’ – and several STIs. The
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My older partner nags me to be organised, but I’m just forgetful 22 Apr 1:00am My older partner nags me to be organised, but I’m just forgetful
The Guardian
Step up to your responsibilities and stop conjuring excuses, advises Mariella Frostrup, to a young woman who won’t stand up for herself
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Eco glitter is for life – not just festivals | Gemma Cairney 22 Apr 1:00am Eco glitter is for life – not just festivals | Gemma Cairney
The Guardian
The sparkly stuff now comes in biodegradable form. So there’s no excuse I went through a phase of aspiring to a more ‘minimal’ look. But I realise it was some sort of twisted bout of seasonal gloom. Because right now, as I look up to the sky and see it twinkling with sporadic beams of sunlight, I think to hell with ‘chic’; to hell with the ‘more grown-up’… I’m ready for glitter again. I’m someone who usually believes glitter is for life and not just for festivals. One of my best friends, punk feminist showgirl
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Brat, London: ‘The culinary equivalent of an Anthony Hopkins performance’ – restaurant review 22 Apr 1:00am Brat, London: ‘The culinary equivalent of an Anthony Hopkins performance’ – restaurant review
The Guardian
Some of the dishes Tomos Parry cooks at Brat are simplicity itself, and some are simply perfect
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Lifting the lid: eyeliners are brightening up | Eva Wiseman 22 Apr 1:00am Lifting the lid: eyeliners are brightening up | Eva Wiseman
The Guardian
Be bold and go for colours in blazing streaks across your lids At Missoni, graphic swooshes of colour above the eyes were mixed in shades of the rainbow; big blocks visible from the other side of the room. For a prettier (though no less bold) adjustment, try a fine line of bright eyeliner rather than a stamped-on block. Work up from an easy purple to blue or green – and, when you’re ready, go for a nice emotional pink. Trust us.
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Seventies survivor: my time-warp bungalow 22 Apr 1:00am Seventies survivor: my time-warp bungalow
The Guardian
Sheridan Coakley revitalised British design through his shop, SCP. Now he’s doing the same with his Hampshire home At the far end of Sheridan Coakley’s 1970s bungalow is a bathroom that has been frozen in time. It is encased in high-gloss brown tiles. There are two brown sinks built into a vanity unit the shape of a baby grand piano. A 40-year-old beige shagpile carpet creeps up the walls. It’s like stepping into a bowl of chocolate ganache. “It is kind of kitsch,” admits Coakley. The house was built by a local architect for a bachelor – an engineer with a Porsche Targa in the car port – in 1974. “Because he was an engineer, everything is such good quality,” says Coakley, who bought the property from the original owner 15 years ago. He’d been searching for a house in the area for two years before seeing it advertised in the local paper. In the early days people came to SCP in Shoreditch in a taxi and left it running. They had no idea where they were
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Montague Allston bike preview: ‘Performance and portability in one package’ | Martin Love 22 Apr 1:00am Montague Allston bike preview: ‘Performance and portability in one package’ | Martin Love
The Guardian
A full-size bike that’s as ridable as a standard frame and as practical as a small folder
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MG ZS review: ‘The romance is gone but it’s a viable contender’ | Martin Love 22 Apr 1:00am MG ZS review: ‘The romance is gone but it’s a viable contender’ | Martin Love
The Guardian
Cheap, cheerful and Chinese: the new MG ZS is a very different car
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Mini ponds for compact gardens 22 Apr 1:00am Mini ponds for compact gardens
The Guardian
Bring a small plot to life with a water feature – however tiny Of all the ingredients that make up a garden – trees, boundaries, seating areas, planted beds, lawns – in my experience there is nothing that captures the interest of the visitor time and time again quite like a water feature. Place one in any plot and it is hands down the first thing our eyes are drawn to and the one we are most likely to wander towards to inspect most closely. This unique ability for water not only to catch our interest but to hold it longer than any other landscape feature is probably something that has been hardwired into our psychology since we wandered the Serengeti. However, in our increasingly tiny gardens, ponds are often thought of as an impossible dream, something only for those with rolling lawns and acres of space. But get your planting choice right and anyone can have a stunning piece of nature in a container as small as 60cm wide, which will fit into little patios, backyards and roof terraces.
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Lucy Cooke: ‘I loved to drink, smoke and have a good time. Getting cancer at 45 marked an end to that’ 22 Apr 1:00am Lucy Cooke: ‘I loved to drink, smoke and have a good time. Getting cancer at 45 marked an end to that’
The Guardian
The zoologist talks about how breast cancer was a positive experience for her, and how she’s now a lot healthier thanks to the joys of gardening My job is so varied. I am a presenter, filmmaker and a writer. I tell stories about animals. Animals are in my blood – my father was a keen amateur naturalist and so was his father. If I feel stressed and go for a walk in the woods or by the sea and immerse myself in nature it has the ability to really calm me down.
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A quick note to say thank you… to my maths teacher 22 Apr 1:00am A quick note to say thank you… to my maths teacher
The Guardian
Michael East, who teaches clinical medicine in London, is grateful for the stoic persistence of Mrs Craddock, who never gave up on him Mrs Craddock was Scottish, and she taught me maths at secondary school. But I didn’t like maths. I didn’t think I was good at it and I was struggling with it. Mrs Craddock was very stoic though: she simply kept on going, for two or three years she kept on chipping away at what I needed to learn. She never gave up on me and gradually she made me realise that... I could do it!
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22 Apr 12:59am My young daughter is fine with snakes, but I have to run away
The Guardian
I can’t help but contrast my own lack of curiosity, hampered by fear and thinking I know everything already, with my daughter’s innocent questioning of the world Last September, my daughter and I were walking along the promenade on a beach holiday, marvelling at a sunset, when she let go of my hand and bent over something on the ground. Before I could clock what she was doing, she had picked up a small crab, holding the top and bottom between her thumb and middle finger, and dropped it into the water. She beamed at us. “I rescued it,” she said. I freaked out, worried that she could have got hurt, before I noticed that around us a small crowd had gathered, amazed at the bravery of this cute, smiley three-year-old who felt no fear in picking up a crab and returning it to the ocean before it got stepped on, or worse. I’m thinking about this when I take my daughter to yet another friend’s birthday party. Without sounding ungrateful for the invites for my daughter, I’ve found these parties have taken over every single weekend for the past six months or so. This one, however, is more fun than a standard soft play where the kids go wild and then eat soggy sandwiches while songs from
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